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Ethical

Jewellery has the potential to change lives. Our projects give communities a re-found respect for traditional design and a sense of self-confidence, pride in their creations and a path towards economic independence.

Aung Chay

Taught by his uncle, the master goldsmith of the village, Aung Chay first began learning his craft at the age of thirteen in Ramree Island, Rakhine. By the age of sixteen Aung was forced to leave school in order to help his family financially. It was then he made the conscious decision to stay close to them and continue to develop his craft.

Aung Chay's story
Saeeda

Born as a refugee into the poor conditions of a Peshwari camp, Saeeda became seriously ill during the first few weeks of her life. Struck down with cerebral meningitis, she was unable to walk and lost her hearing. Fortunately, over the years she regained mobility, but sadly her hearing never returned.

Saeeda's story
Javid

Born in Kabul, but exiled during the Taliban government, Javid learnt the craft of goldmithing in Pakistan as a young man. In 2001, he and his family returned to Kabul. Happy to be home he married, had two children and started a new life.

Javid's story
Javier

An Aymara Indian from Bolivia, Javier is the son of a Gold miner who began working in the mines of Tipuwani himself, at a very young age. He later moved onto goldsmithing and now has a tiny workshop in Miraflores near the coca market. From this little space, he makes beautiful creations for the indigenous Chola ladies of La Paz who invest heavily in the precious metal.

Javier's story
Aman

Aman is a Lua from Kenya, who first began selling hand-carved wooden spoons at the market in Nairobi. At the time he and his family lived in Kibera, a huge slum in the city, surrounded by garbage. It was often a violent and hazardous place to live, but he and his brothers continued to develop their craft from a small mud hut.

Aman's story
Om Prakash

The son of a farmer, Om learnt stone cutting when young. He first specialized in carving crystal Gods for the temples, but now runs a small workshop in Sanganer, just outside jaipur. He has a wonderful sensitivity to stones and has worked with us for over twenty years.

Om Prakash's story
Tomuco

Tomuco is a San Bushman from Ghanzi in Botswana, and like all in her community her life is going through many changes. From being independent hunter gatherers, the Bushmen have slowly been pushed off their land, banned from hunting and given no rights, or jobs.

Tomuco's story
Juan

Juan is a quiet man whose primary business is selling fresh fruit and vegetables in Santiago de Chile. His quiet passion, however, is for the jewellery of his people, the Mapuche Indians. Juan spent his youth working as an apprentice with old master Mapuche silversmiths in different parts of Chile, learning the stories of their designs and the symbolism of their protective amulets.

Juan's story
Rubellino

Rubellino a Kuna Indian goldsmith from Kunayala, lives on a tiny island in the Caribbean Sea, just off the coast of Panama. His community are fiercely independent, yet deeply traditional and take great pride in defending their rich culture and values.

Rubellino's story

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